Phoenix Regional Dispatch Interoperability Guide

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1 Phoenix Regional Dispatch Interoperability Guide Phoenix Regional COMU Interoperability Working Group Sponsored by the Phoenix Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) Rev: Rel: 3.2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

2 Revision Log Version Date Author Change Description 1.0 9/2014 Ron Parks Original document 2.0 DRAFT 3/21/2016 Ron Parks 2.1 3/23/2016 Ron Parks 2.1 3/24/2016 Ron Parks Document released 2.2 1/3/2017 Ron Parks 3.0 4/10/2017 Ron Parks 3.1 4/17/2017 Ron Parks 3.2 8/29/2017 Ron Parks Revision log added, extensive updates to all areas to bring current with changes in practice. Added section 3.3 regarding not using console tones. Corrected error on G-H Deck organizational chart in section 3.4. Minor typographical changes. Updated G/H Deck console screens to match regional PSAP briefing presentation in sections 1.3 and 3.0. Revised G/H deck channels available in DPS dispatch and Mesa/Gilbert G/H deck functionality (manual selection required in Mesa) in section 2.0. Updated all sections and scenarios for applicability to both RWC and Non-RWC agencies. Removed Non-RWC agency specific information in section 2.0 and added Non-RWC Agency Interoperability Resources reference sheet and Interoperability Continuum to Appendix. General textual updates. Revised to allow immediate use of G1 for non- RWC agencies in a pursuit situation. Per RWC Operations Working Group approval. Added the option of cache or loaner radios in section 4.6. Rev: Rel: 3.2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

3 Phoenix Regional Dispatch Interoperabilty Guide INDEX Preface Section 1 A few basics just for review 1.0 The Regional Wireless Cooperative (RWC) 1.1 The PSAP Intercommunications System 1.2 Access and use of Interoperability Channels 1.3 Patching and Multi-Selecting Section 2 Regional Resource Overview 2.0 G and H Decks 2.1 Ocean or O Deck and L Deck 2.2 I Deck - Arizona Interagency Radio System (AIRS) 2.3 Coverage Areas Section 3 Utilizing Regional Resources 3.0 Overview 3.1 Patching vs. Direct use of an Interoperability Channel 3.2 Patching and Encryption 3.3 Console Tones 3.4 G-H Deck Organizational Chart 3.5 Turning Repeaters OFF and ON Section 4 Example Scenarios 4.1 Immediate Tactical Incidents 4.2 Planned Tactical Operations 4.3 Planned Events 4.4 Outside Agency Assistance 4.5 Be the Magic Behind the Curtain 4.6 Cache or Loaner Radios 4.7 Unified Command Appendices A. G Deck /H Deck Quick Reference B. Non-RWC Agency Interoperability Resources C. U.S. Department of Homeland Security Interoperability Continuum D. Glossary of Terms MOTOROLA and MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS are trademarks or registered trademarks of Motorola Trademark Holdings, LLC All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Rev: Rel: 3.2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

4 Preface Public safety communications interoperability is a subject of much discussion across the nation. While its importance is not in question, differing technologies and opinions as to how it should be implemented have resulted in a considerable challenge. The Phoenix region has some of the finest interoperability resources available. State-of-the-art radio systems such as the Regional Wireless Cooperative (RWC), the Topaz Regional Wireless Cooperative (TRWC), the building out of the new MCSO system as well as Arizona DPS resources give us a fine set of tools to work with. There are two basic philosophies when it comes to interoperability: 1. Every agency programs every other agencies channels into their radios and switch to the other agency when working together. 2. Common regional interoperability channels and resources are established for use by all on an organized and structured basis. While the first option sounds good on the surface, in an area the size of the Phoenix Region these super radios quickly become unwieldy. Too many channels that take too much effort to find coupled with a lack of knowledge of the other agency district boundaries, channel usage, and varying jurisdictional policies result in delays and confusion. Management of these radios for individual jurisdictional updates as well as on multiple encryption capable systems compounds the issue. The second option simplifies interoperability considerably. Establishing common ground for all agencies to utilize on a cooperative, shared basis results in consistency, eases access, and simplifies policies and procedures along with end user training for both dispatchers and field units. While the answer is not always easy even with the resources we have in the Phoenix Region, common interoperability assets are ready and available for use. Interagency cooperation has been established for common, shared interoperability resources across the region and our practices are built upon the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Interoperability Continuum (See Appendix C). This guide seeks to build best practice and most of all, provide for the interoperable communications needs of our first responders across all of our local jurisdictions. The Phoenix Regional COMU Interoperability Working Group, as part of the Phoenix UASI, collaborates region-wide to develop and maintain best practices for interoperable communications. More information is available by contacting: Ron Parks, Arizona All-Hazards COML/COMT Chandler Police Communications Updated August, 2017 Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 1 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

5 Section 1 A few basics just for review 1.0 The Regional Wireless Cooperative (RWC) The RWC radio network is a state of the art, wide area, multi-zone system that includes 20 Phoenix area member agencies (at the time of this writing) and covers an area of roughly 11,000 square miles. The shared network provides excellent radio coverage within the Maricopa County region, selected channels that can roam outside of local jurisdictions, encryption capabilities, and numerous options for interoperating among agencies. RWC interoperability resources are shared with public safety entities, including non-rwc agencies, throughout the region. Each RWC dispatch center is responsible for management and activation of the network s interoperability resources. Pre-planned use of these resources is managed by RWC agency dispatch supervisors on a joint calendar and RWC network consoles allow dispatchers to enable and disable each channel as needed, including immediate activation for a tactical situation. Therefore, other than coordinating via the PSAP Intercommunications System for immediate tactical incidents, individual RWC dispatch centers do not need to contact anyone else to activate and utilize these resources. 1.1 The PSAP Intercommunications System The PSAP Intercommunications System is a valley wide network that provides the following functions: o PSAP East/PSAP West Intercom or party line between all valley dispatch centers PSAP East and PSAP West are patched together for valley wide coverage and generally referred to in this documentation as the PSAP channel. On non-rwc agency consoles, these will appear as a single resource labeled PSAP CALL. These channels are never patched to other channels; they are purely for communications between dispatchers. These channels are not authorized for use in field radios; they are restricted to the regional PSAP centers. PSAP is NOT encrypted. Typical RWC PSAP resource!!!! Typical Non-RWC PSAP resource Non-RWC agencies should have a channel labeled PSAP CALL for the PSAP channel. Older consoles may label this channel as DOJ rather than PSAP and should be updated to match regional naming conventions. They may also have a PSAP PATCH resource,! the PSAP PATCH resources are no longer in use as the G and H Deck interoperability channels documented below now provide a much improved solution for interoperable patching. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 2 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

6 1.2 Access and use of Interoperability Channels RWC network agencies have direct access to and control over interoperability channels from their consoles so do not need anything else to interoperate with other RWC agencies. However, for those agencies that are not part of the RWC, contact with an RWC dispatch center will be necessary to utilize the RWC interoperability resources. It should be noted that use of RWC interoperability channels requires at least one RWC agency to be involved in support of a multi-jurisdictional event. RWC interoperability resources may not be used for any single agency operational purpose. The one exception is a non-rwc agency initiating a vehicular pursuit may announce the pursuit on the PSAP channel and immediately utilize G Deck channel Patching and Multi Selecting There has been a lot of confusion over the difference between patching and multi selecting, especially when it comes to doing both of them at the same time. First of all: A PATCH connects dispatchers and all units on the patched channels in a party line fashion. Everyone can hear and talk to everyone. A MULTI SELECT is a dispatcher announcement function. Multi select allows the dispatcher to talk and listen over multiple channels while the units in the field are still only operational on their individual channels. They cannot talk to field units other than the units that are on the same channel they are on. The issue we run into is a couple of inconsistencies in the way all of this operates as of this writing. Note: this is applicable to MOTOROLA Gold Elite and MCC7500 consoles only. Issue #1 Let s say we patch a PATROL channel to a TACTICAL channel and the dispatcher is selected on the PATROL channel. If an officer was to activate an emergency button on the TACTICAL channel (the channel the dispatcher is NOT selected on ) the 10-second hot microphone will not be heard in the dispatcher s headset. This is why the workaround is to both patch AND multi select. Multi select, by its very nature, selects multiple channels into the dispatcher s headset. Issue #2 This one is much less consistent but there have been instances where channels are patched and only one side of the conversation is heard by either the dispatcher or the field units. Again, both patching and multi selecting seems to resolve this issue. Therefore, that leaves us with this best practice: If you patch you should also mutli select. Note the multi select must be the place you end up last, with the multi select window active, highlighted in green and all of the patched and multi selected resources also showing selected. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 3 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

7 Note also the patch and multi select must be on the console where the active incident dispatcher is sitting. See the illustration below for an example of patching and multi selecting two channels, HOT and H04 PS 04 (H Deck channel 4), on a Chandler console. This is how the screen should look on the active dispatcher s console when things are ready to go; both patched and multi selected, with the multi select active. For a multi select to be active, the Msel window must be selected (green) with the desired resources added to the window, which will cause all multi-selected resources to show selected (green border). Since this is where you need to end up when patching and multi selecting, best bet is to patch first, then multi select and insure the multi select is active. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 4 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

8 Section 2 Regional Resource Overview 2.0 G and H Decks First a Deck is simply a set of 16 channels. The channel knob on the radio in use by first responders has 16 positions and there are multiple sets or Decks (or zones) of 16 channels in the radios. G Deck RWC System. Available to non-rwc agencies. Valley wide coverage. NOT ENCRYPTED. 15 channels. H Deck RWC System. Available to non-rwc agencies. Valley wide coverage. ENCRYPTED. 16 channels. G and H Decks operate with the exact same availability and policies for use, the only difference is ENCRYPTION. G and H Decks may only be used for interoperability between agencies and must include at least one RWC agency. Can be used stand-alone or patched. G/H Deck common elements Channel 1: Valley wide extreme wide area coverage and reserved for vehicular pursuit incidents, immediately available to both RWC and non-rwc agencies. Channels 2 5: reserved for immediate tactical use. Channels 6 and higher reserved for planned events. EMERGENCY buttons are NOT active on G or H Decks. Access to G/H Deck resources among non-rwc agencies See Non-RWC Agency Interoperability Resources in the appendix for individual agency details. 2.1 Ocean or O Deck and L Deck O Deck RWC System. Mountain top towers **. NOT encrypted. 16 channels. EMERGENCY buttons are NOT active on O Deck. O Deck may be used for interoperability and does not require an RWC member to be engaged other than to activate the repeater. ** Street Level coverage, limited reliability inside buildings. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 5 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

9 L Deck RWC System. NOT encrypted. 16 channels. EMERGENCY buttons are NOT active on L Deck. Only available in RWC agency radios. L Deck may only be used for interoperability between agencies under the same availability and policies for use as G Deck. 2.2 I Deck - Arizona Interagency Radio System (AIRS) Conventional, analog, mountaintop repeaters. Cross-patched between VHF/UHF/800 MHz (any agency using any one of the AIRS channels is automatically talking on the matching VHF, UHF, and 800 MHz channels simultaneously). Five channels assigned to regions throughout Arizona. o AIRS 1 is assigned to Maricopa County. Street Level. o Limited reliability inside buildings. Not heavily used in the valley due to the fact we have more robust resources available. EMERGENCY buttons are NOT active on AIRS. AIRS channel assignment map and coverage map: Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 6 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

10 2.3 Coverage Areas It is important to understand most individual RWC agency day-to-day operational channels do NOT operate valley wide. These channels will lose coverage if units stray too far outside of the area of their individual jurisdictions. Most RWC agencies have select individual channels that have wide area coverage. G, H, L, and O decks provide wide area coverage. EMERGENCY buttons are NOT active on G, H, L, and O Decks 1. Example: G1 COVERAGE COMPARED TO CHANDLER OPERATIONAL CHANNEL COVERAGE G1 coverage, 11,000 square miles Local Chandler area coverage (green) compared to G1 1 Note: Phoenix Region Fire Department agencies utilize an emergency button process whereby the emergency button reverts the radio back to a common channel even when operating on an interoperability deck. This is also in a few law enforcement radios but is neither common nor recommended in law enforcement. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 7 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

11 Section 3 Utilizing Regional Resources Typical G and H Deck resources on an RWC agency console. Non-RWC agencies typically access RWC interoperability channels via a control station resource. The non-rwc agency dispatch center may only have access to a subset of the channels (See Appendix B). Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 8 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

12 3.0 Overview The key elements of using G and H Deck: G1/H1: Valley wide extreme wide area coverage and reserved for vehicular pursuit incidents, immediately available to both RWC and non-rwc agencies. o The repeaters for these channels are left enabled at all times. G2 G5/H2 H5: reserved for immediate tactical use. o Assistance on a stationary incident such as a suspect search using an aircraft o An RWC dispatch center checks the status of the repeaters and enables an OFF repeater for immediate use. G6/H6 and higher reserved for planned events and/or operations. o Annual events such as New Year s Eve where outside agencies are assisting or scheduled task force operations. o Managed on a regional calendar by RWC agency dispatch supervisors. G Deck is in the clear. H Deck is ENCRYPTED. For immediate tactical use of G1-G5 and H1-H5 an RWC dispatch center will check the status of the repeaters and may enable any repeater in the OFF condition for immediate use. Coordination via the PSAP channel is advised, especially in the case of a rapidly moving vehicle incident being taken to G1. The scheduled use of G and H Deck channels 6-16 is managed by RWC agencies via a regional calendar and must be reserved by an RWC dispatch center supervisor. Use of L and O Decks is also scheduled this way. Per RWC policy, scheduled use of RWC interoperability resources for longer than a 29-day period requires advance approval by the RWC Operations Working Group. 3.1 Patching vs. Direct use of an Interoperability Channel There are three basic scenarios in play when utilizing interoperability resources: An agency requesting assistance from another agency (air support, additional field resources, etc.). In this case, the best practice is for the initiating agency to patch their field channel to the interoperability resource so that their field units have the tactical advantage of not having to switch channels. The outside units responding to assist should switch directly to the interoperability channel. This also insures the outside agency units will have radio coverage outside their own jurisdiction and simplifies the response. An agency responding to assist another agency. The outside agency should switch directly to the interoperability channel indicated by the agency requesting assistance. A rapidly moving pursuit scenario that is being taken to G1. While the initiating agency may patch G1 to their local channel for tactical safety, ALL units must switch to G1 when safe to do so otherwise risk running out of radio coverage. This is especially important if exiting a vehicle and transitioning to a portable as the mobile radio will have much greater range than a portable. o Non-RWC agencies who do not have G Deck in field units may patch throughout an incident. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 9 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

13 3.2 Patching and Encryption When patching a local channel to an interoperability resource consideration should be given to encryption. If the traffic is being patched from a clear channel, utilize G Deck. If the traffic is being patched from an encrypted channel, use H Deck. Any combination of patching encrypted to unencrypted channels results in ALL traffic being unencrypted. Encryption on the RWC interoperability channels utilizes a common, shared encryption key across the region (including non-rwc agencies capable of supporting over the air encryption management) and follows the National Law Enforcement Communications Center (NLECC) recommendations. 3.3 Console Tones When patched to or otherwise utilizing any interoperability channel do NOT utilize console tones such as alert tones, hot tones, or channel markers. Console tones have different meanings to different agencies and can cause confusion while channel markers continually consume patch resources and can interfere with field unit ability to access the channel when needed. 3.4 G-H Deck Organizational Chart The following chart illustrates the organization and operational parameters of G and H Deck: Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 10 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

14 3.5 Turning Repeaters OFF and ON G1 and H1 repeaters should be left in the ON condition at all times. All other repeaters should be turned off when an incident or event has terminated. Only RWC dispatch centers have the capability to enable and disable repeaters. For immediate tactical use of G1-G5 and H1-H5 an RWC dispatch center will check the status of the repeaters and may enable any repeater in the OFF condition for immediate use. Coordination via the PSAP channel is advised, especially in the case of a rapidly moving vehicle incident being taken to G1. Enabling and disabling of the repeaters for G6-15 and H6-15 are the responsibility of the RWC agency that scheduled the use of the channel(s) on the regional calendar. Console example of repeater OFF and ON conditions on an RWC console. Clicking the tower icon will toggle the repeater off and on. Repeater OFF Repeater ON If a repeater is OFF, RWC agency dispatchers will hear units in the field and can transmit however units in the field will NOT be able to talk to each other and non-rwc dispatch centers will also not be able to access the traffic. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 11 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

15 Section 4 Example Scenarios 4.1 Immediate Tactical Incidents Incident Example #1: A local patrol channel, not encrypted, has been restricted due to a suspect fleeing from a traffic stop on foot. The suspect ran into the neighborhood to the north of the traffic stop. A Phoenix helicopter is responding and requesting a channel to contact the local ground units on. An RWC agency dispatch center is required to enable repeaters. SOLUTION: Coordinate the helicopter request via the PSAP channel. An RWC dispatch center checks the repeaters for channels G2 G5 for a channel with the repeater turned off and enables it, let s say G3 is free and use it in this example. Patch and multi select G3 to the local traffic channel on the incident dispatcher s console. Advise Phoenix via the PSAP channel the traffic is on G3 so they can advise the air unit. Local units remain on the local channel, Phoenix helicopter responds on G3. When the incident has concluded, drop the patch and the RWC dispatch center turns off the G3 repeater. SYNOPSIS: The primary goal of this solution is to provide seamless communications between the helicopter and local units on the ground. Local units do not even need to know the channel is patched, as the helicopter communications will be transparent to them. Incident Example #2: An armed robbery is working on an encrypted tactical channel; suspects have fled the scene in a vehicle officers have a good description of. The vehicle comes back stolen and has been located ditched a few blocks away. A perimeter has been set up for the suspects now believed to be on foot. A Mesa K9 unit is responding and requesting a channel to contact the local units on. An RWC agency dispatch center is required to enable repeaters. SOLUTION: Coordinate the K9 request via the PSAP channel. An RWC dispatch center checks the repeaters for channels H2 H5 for a channel with the repeater turned off and enables it, let s say H2 is free and use it in this example. Patch and multi select H2 to the local tactical channel on the incident dispatcher s console. Advise Mesa via the PSAP channel the traffic will be on H2 so they can advise the K9 unit. Local units remain on the tactical channel, Mesa K9 responds on H2. When the incident has concluded, drop the patch and the RWC dispatch center turns off the H2 repeater. SYNOPSIS: As before, the primary goal of this solution is to provide seamless communications between the K9 unit and local units. However, since the traffic is already on an encrypted channel we should make every effort to keep the traffic encrypted by utilizing the encrypted H Deck resources. Local units do not even need to know the tactical channel is patched, as the K9 unit communications will be transparent to them. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 12 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

16 Incident Example #3: On a suspicious traffic stop, as the officer approaches on foot, the suspect places his car in reverse and rams the patrol vehicle then attempts to run the officer down. The suspect vehicle flees north on the 101 freeway with local units in pursuit. SOLUTION: Announce the incident on the PSAP channel and advise you are taking the traffic to G1. If there is already traffic on G1 you should be aware of it via the PSAP channel and fall back to G2-G5. G1 is immediately available to both RWC and non-rwc agencies for a vehicular pursuit situation. RWC agencies should verify the G1 repeater is enabled. Immediately advise all involved units to switch to G1, initiating agency may patch to G1 for tactical safety but should advise all units to switch directly to G1 as soon as possible. Advise and confirm on the PSAP channel the traffic is now on G1 and any assisting jurisdictions may switch there to assist. When the incident has concluded advise on the PSAP channel. SYNOPSIS: The key here is a vehicular pursuit that justifies going to G1. G1, with its extreme wide area coverage, also insures all involved RWC units continue to have radio coverage outside of their local area by having them switch rather than continue to rely on a patch and a local coverage channel. Getting all units to G1 early on in the incident is critical. This is especially critical if a unit is transitioning from a vehicle radio to a lower profile and lower powered portable radio. Example: G1 COVERAGE COMPARED TO CHANDLER OPERATIONAL CHANNEL COVERAGE G1 coverage, 11,000 square miles Local Chandler area coverage (green) compared to G1 This is why it is critical to move traffic to G1 when justified to do so as well as other G/H deck traffic that may be taking place outside your local jurisdiction. Note H Deck Channel 1 is set to this extreme wide area level of coverage and also reserved for these types of incidents if there is justification to encrypt the traffic. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 13 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

17 4.2 Planned Tactical Operations In this example the U.S. Marshals Task Force, Tempe PD, Mesa PD, and GIITEM will be conducting a joint warrant service on a specified date and time. The local officer on the task force has requested an interoperability channel so all units can work together seamlessly. SOLUTION: An RWC agency dispatch supervisor must log into the regional interoperability calendar and reserve an open H Deck channel (H6 H15) for the requested date, time, and duration of the operation. Advise the requesting officer of the H Deck channel that has been reserved for them. At the start of the tactical operation, the reserving RWC agency enables the repeater for the H Deck channel that was reserved. If dispatch monitoring has been requested, assigned dispatcher selects on and monitors the H Deck channel in use by the task force. Officers switch directly to the H Deck channel. At the end of the tactical operation, the RWC agency reserving the channel turns off the repeater. SYNOPSIS: Since this is a planned in advance operation, it needs to be reserved ahead of time. Since it is a sensitive undercover operation, it should be placed on H Deck so the communications are secure. In this case, rather than patching, it is best practice to simply have all units switch to the appropriate H Deck channel. 4.3 Planned Events In this category, we are speaking of civic events. For example, in a recent Ostrich Festival the Scottsdale PD Bike Team came out to assist Chandler PD bike team officers. Since Scottsdale does not have Chandler s event channels in their radios but they do have G Deck, Chandler can utilize a G Deck channel to allow the two teams to seamlessly work together. SOLUTION: An RWC agency dispatch supervisor must log into the regional interoperability calendar and reserve an open G Deck channel (G6 G15) for the duration of the event. At the start of the event, the reserving RWC agency enables the repeater for the G Deck channel that was reserved. Best practice rather than patching is to have all units work directly on the G Deck channel. At the end of the event, the reserving RWC agency turns off the repeater. SYNOPSIS: Since this is a planned event, it needs to be reserved ahead of time and placed on G6-G15. While patching may be used to tie a local event channel to the interoperability channel, best practice is to simply have all units operate directly on the interoperability channel. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 14 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

18 4.4 Outside Agency Assistance Tempe PD has requested assistance on an incident in their city and has advised the traffic is on G5. SOLUTION: Advise responding units to switch to G5. SYNOPSIS: Since local units are leaving the local jurisdiction, and could run out of coverage on local channels, they need to switch directly to the G Deck (or H Deck ) channel rather than patching them to one of the local channels that could lose coverage. 4.5 Be the Magic Behind the Curtain As interoperability is managed within dispatch centers, the many technical nuances such as patching, activating repeaters, and channel assignments should be transparent to users in the field. Officers and other first responders in the field simply need to communicate with outside agency responders. As far as all in the field are concerned, be they on a local channel that is patched or on an interoperability channel, everyone is communicating on a common resource. There is no need to engage them in the technicalities beyond advising what channel(s) the traffic is working on. For example, when patched from a local district or tactical channel to an interoperability channel with resources such as an air unit responding, local units remain on their channel and dispatchers simply advise the agency providing the air unit of the interoperability channel the traffic is on. No further explanation is needed. 4.6 Cache or Loaner Radios Be the Magic Behind the Curtain! Utilization of cache or individual agency loaner radios is still a valid option when working with agencies that do not have access to regional resources in their radios. This is especially valuable when responders from outside the region are assisting. 4.7 Unified Command There are times, even with the tremendous resources available in the Phoenix Region, where circumstances prevent the use of communications interoperability. Availability of channels, limited access to channels especially in non-rwc dispatch centers, or even necessary decisions made by Incident Command may circumvent our best efforts. In these cases, the basic interagency support premise of Unified Command still applies. Supervisors and incident commanders from collaborating agencies, gathered together to manage an incident on their respective channels, are able to exchange information to insure coordination and safety among all responders. When there are no alternatives available, establishing Unified Command is still a vital resource for interagency cooperation. Rev: Rel: 3.2 Page 15 of 15 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

19 Phoenix Regional Dispatch Interoperability Guide APPENDICES A. G Deck/H Deck Quick Reference B. Non-RWC Agency Interoperability Resources C. U.S. Department of Homeland Security Interoperability Continuum D. Glossary of Terms FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

20 APPENDIX A Phoenix Regional COMU Interoperability Working Group G DECK / H DECK QUICK REFERENCE G DECK IN THE CLEAR H DECK - ENCRYPTED Complete procedures for use of RWC interoperability resources: See Interoperability Talk Groups located at Best Practice: If local traffic is on a CLEAR channel USE G DECK. If local traffic is on an ENCRYPTED channel USE H DECK. Use of these resources requires the active participation of an RWC agency. G1/H1 G1 and H1 are reserved for vehicular pursuit incidents and are immediately available to both RWC and non-rwc agencies. Use when local officers are involved in a moving incident and leaving local jurisdiction, or it appears imminent they will do so. If it is a stationary incident or one that is not likely to leave the local jurisdiction such as an area search do not use G1 or H1. Use of G1 or H1 can be immediately coordinated via PSAP CALL; it does not require referencing the interoperability calendar. Non-RWC agencies do not need approval from RWC agencies to use G1/H1. G1 and H1 repeaters should be left in the on condition at all times. RWC dispatch centers should verify repeaters are enabled when traffic is being moved to G1/H1. Key to using G1 or H1 is getting EVERYONE to switch to G1 or H1 early and NOT patch to local operational channels long term. This is because as the incident moves farther away from the local jurisdiction the local channels may go out of range while G1 and H1 have extreme wide area coverage. Patching is recommended as a safety measure only, to insure all units have the opportunity to switch. Non-RWC agencies who do not have G/H Deck in their field units may patch throughout an incident to provide connectivity with G1/H1. Advise via PSAP CALL when you have cleared G1 or H1. G2-G5/H2-H5 G/H channels 2 through 5 are for immediate tactical usage on a stationary or local area incident An RWC dispatch center must first verify a channel is available by checking the repeater status, a repeater that is off indicates an available channel. A repeater in the off condition may be immediately activated and used, there is no need to check or update the regional interoperability calendar. An RWC dispatch center must enable the repeater for the selected channel. An incident that is within the local jurisdiction and requesting outside agency assistance, for example a helicopter request to assist with an area search, should utilize G2-G5 or H2-H5 for the assisting agency. In this case the local jurisdiction can patch operational channels to the G/H Deck channel in use so local units do not have to switch channels. Local units do not even need to know the channels are patched. When an assisting agency is using G2-5/H2-5 in responding to another jurisdiction, the assisting agency units switch directly to the G or H channel that has been set up for the operation. The RWC dispatch center enabling the repeater is responsible for disabling the repeater when the traffic is cleared. APPENDIX A - Phoenix Regional COMU G Deck / H Deck Quick Reference Rev: Page 1 of 2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

21 G6-15/H6-16 G6-15 and H6-16 are for events or tactical operations that are planned in advance Events/operations should be scheduled in advance via the Regional Interoperability Calendar by an RWC agency dispatch supervisor. RWC dispatch center must enable the repeater at the indicated date and time, and disable the repeater when done with the channel. Civic events utilizing resources from outside agencies (G deck patched to event channel or used stand-alone), planned multi-agency warrant service or task force operations (use H Deck), etc. H16 has extreme wide area coverage for encrypted use on wide ranging operations or those that may be on the outer boundaries of the RWC system coverage area. G-H DECK QUICK REFERENCE CHART G H SCENARIO ACTION VEHICULAR PURSUIT ALL UNITS SWITCH G1 H1 MAY PATCH TO PROVIDE TIME FOR UNITS TO SWITCH TO G1 ASAP COORDINATE VIA PSAP CHANNEL IMMEDIATE TACTICAL INCIDENT THAT IS CONFINED WITHIN JURISDICTION G2 H2 WITHIN AN AGENCY JURISDICTION GENERALLY PATCH G3 H3 CHECK REPEATER STATUS AND G4 H4 ASSISTING ANOTHER JURISDICTION AND LEAVING LEAVING JURISDICTION ACTIVATE AVAILABLE G5 H5 LOCAL AGENCY JURISDICTION UNITS WILL NEED (AVAILABLE IF REPEATER OFF) TO SWITCH G6 H6 G7 H7 PATCH TO LOCAL EVENT G8 H8 CHANNEL FOR G9 H9 EVENT WITHIN LOCAL G10 H10 PLANNED OPERATIONS/EVENTS JURISDICTION SCHEDULE AND COORDINATE G11 H11 VIA CALENDAR G12 H12 OUTSIDE LOCAL G13 H13 JURISDICTION G14 H14 UNITS WILL NEED G15 H15 TO SWITCH H16 H16 has extreme wide area coverage Turning Repeaters OFF and ON (RWC dispatch centers only) If a repeater is OFF, RWC agency dispatchers will hear units in the field and can transmit however units in the field will NOT be able to talk to each other and Non-RWC dispatch centers will also not be able to access the traffic. Repeater OFF Repeater ON APPENDIX A - Phoenix Regional COMU G Deck / H Deck Quick Reference Rev: Page 2 of 2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

22 APPENDIX C Phoenix Regional COMU Interoperability Working Group U.S. Department of Homeland Security Interoperability Continuum The Phoenix Regional COMU Interoperability Working Group develops and utilizes best practices in cooperation with and established within the lanes of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Interoperability Continuum. Our practices engage continuous improvement within these initiatives. The COMU also integrates with the Arizona Statewide Communications Interoperability Plan (SCIP) and its vision statement: Public safety and service agencies/organizations within Arizona, at all levels of government and within non-governmental organizations have a culture of collaboration to achieve interoperable communications, are adequately trained, and encouraged to utilize such systems effectively in multi-disciplinary, multijurisdictional operations and response. APPENDIX C - Interoperability Continuum Rev: Page 1 of 1 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

23 APPENDIX D Phoenix Regional COMU Interoperability Working Group Glossary of Terms AIRS: Arizona Interagency Radio System, a group of conventional analog mountain top repeaters that are cross patched between VHF, UHF, and 800 MHz frequencies. Channel: A single talk path on a radio system. Conventional A radio system that uses individual frequencies for talk paths. Also see Trunked System: System. Deck: A group of talkgroups or channels (typically 16) in a radio. Sometimes referred to as a zone and labeled as such on portable and mobile radios. DOJ: Department of Justice, DOJ is an older term sometimes applied to the system now known as the PSAP Intercommunications System. DOJ CALL: Obsolete term for what is now the PSAP channel. DOJ PATCH: Obsolete term for the PSAP PATCH resources no longer in use. DPS: Arizona Department of Public Safety. Encryption: A secure algorithm based on a specific key that can be applied to a talkgroup or channel so that it can only be utilized by a subscriber with the matching key. Gold Elite: A Motorola dispatch console. Emergency Button: A button (usually orange in color) on portable and mobile radios that activates an immediate emergency notification on dispatch consoles. On the RWC system this includes a 10 second period where the radio s microphone is open so the audio from the emergency activated radio can be monitored with no further action required by the radio user. G Deck: A group of 15 talkgroups on the RWC network used for interoperability purposes, not encrypted. G1: G Deck 01, reserved for incidents that are moving, dynamic, and crossing jurisdictional boundaries. G1 is set to provide extreme wide area coverage across the 11,000 square mile footprint of the RWC network. G1 is NOT encrypted. H Deck: A group of 16 talkgroups on the RWC network used for interoperability purposes, encrypted. H1: H Deck 01, reserved for incidents that are moving, dynamic, and crossing jurisdictional boundaries. H1 is set to provide extreme wide area coverage across the 11,000 square mile footprint of the RWC network. H1 is ENCRYPTED. Interoperability A shared regional calendar for management of interoperability resources such as Calendar: G and H Decks. Interoperability A non-rwc member agency that has been granted rights to utilize subscribers on Partner: the RWC system for interoperability purposes. L Deck: A group of 16 talkgroups on the RWC network used for interoperability purposes, not encrypted. MCC-7500: A Motorola dispatch console. MCSO: Maricopa County Sheriff s Office Multi Select: A dispatch console function that allows a dispatcher to make announcements over multiple talkgroups or channels. O Deck: A group of 16 talkgroups on the RWC network that are operational from mountaintop and high towers sites for extended street level coverage, not APPENDIX D - - Glossary of Terms Rev: Page 1 of 2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

24 encrypted. Sometimes referred to as Ocean Deck. OTAR: Over The Air Rekeying; the management of access to encrypted talkgroups from a centralized server in the wireless network. Patch: The joining of two or more talkgroups or channels into a single party line channel. Typically implemented on a dispatch console. PSAP: Public Safety Answering Point; a call and radio dispatch center. PSAP CALL: Interagency talkgroup on the RWC network for interagency communications directly between PSAP centers, referred to as the PSAP channel. PSAP EAST: Interagency talkgroup on the RWC network for interagency communications directly between PSAP centers in the east valley, patched to PSAP WEST creating the valley wide PSAP channel. PSAP Intercommunications System: A Phoenix regional communications system on the RWC network that allows for direct PSAP to PSAP radio communications as well as providing interoperability resources for non-rwc agency dispatch centers. PSAP WEST: Interagency talkgroup on the RWC network for interagency communications directly between PSAP centers in the west valley, patched to PSAP EAST creating the valley wide PSAP CALL talkgroup. PSAP PATCH: Obsolete talkgroups on the RWC network used for patching RWC agency talkgroups, no longer in use. Repeater: A device that automatically re-transmits or repeats the signal from a portable or mobile radio. Generally located on a tower or mountaintop to increase range. Resource: A single channel or talkgroup on a dispatch console. RWC: The Regional Wireless Cooperative based in the Phoenix region. Subscriber: A radio or console on a wireless network. Trunked System: A radio system that reuses specific frequencies in a rotating fashion by creating virtual talk paths called talkgroups. Talkgroup: A single talk path or channel for communications on a trunked radio system. TRWC: The Topaz Regional Wireless Cooperative based in the eastern Phoenix region. UHF: The Ultra High Frequency range, ranging from 300 MHz to 3 GHz. VHF: The Very High Frequency range, typically between 136 and 300 MHz but can go as low as 30 MHz. Zone: A group of talkgroups or channels (typically 16) in a radio. See Deck. APPENDIX D - - Glossary of Terms Rev: Page 2 of 2 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO)

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