12 Probability. Introduction Randomness

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "12 Probability. Introduction Randomness"

Transcription

1 2 Probability Assessment statements 5.2 Concepts of trial, outcome, equally likely outcomes, sample space (U) and event. The probability of an event A as P(A) 5 n(a)/n(u ). The complementary events as A and A9 (not A); P(A) P(A9) 5. Use of Venn diagrams, tree diagrams and tables of outcomes to solve problems. 5.3 Combined events, the formula: P(A B) 5 P(A) P(B) 2 P(A B). P(A B) 5 0 for mutually exclusive events. 5.4 Conditional probability; the definition: P(A B) 5 P(A B)/P(B). Independent events; the definition: P(A B) 5 P(A) 5 P(A B9). Use of Bayes theorem for a maximum of three events. Introduction Now that you have learned to describe a data set in Chapter, how can you use sample data to draw conclusions about the populations from which you drew your samples? The techniques we use in drawing conclusions are part of what we call inferential statistics, which is a part of one of the HL options. Inferential statistics uses probability as one of its tools. To use this tool properly, you must first understand how it works. This chapter will introduce you to the language and basic tools of probability. The variables we discussed in Chapter can now be redefined as random variables, whose values depend on the chance selection of the elements in the sample. Using probability as a tool, you will be able to create probability distributions that serve as models for random variables. You can then describe these using a mean and a standard deviation as you did in Chapter. 2. Randomness Probability is the study of randomness and uncertainty. The reasoning in statistics rests on asking, How often would this method give a correct answer if I used it very many times? When we produce data by random sampling or by experiments, the laws of probability enable us to answer the question, What would happen if we did this many times? 56

2 What does random mean? In ordinary speech, we use random to denote things that are unpredictable. Events that are random are not perfectly predictable, but they have long-term regularities that we can describe and quantify using probability. In contrast, haphazard events do not necessarily have long-term regularities. Take, for example, the tossing of an unbiased coin and observing the number of heads that appear. This is random behaviour. When you throw the coin, there are only two outcomes, heads or tails. Figure 2. shows the results of the first 50 tosses of an experiment that tossed the coin 5000 times. Two sets of trials are shown. The red graph shows the result of the first trial: the first toss was a head followed by a tail, making the proportion of heads to be 0.5. The third toss was also a tail, so the proportion of heads is 0.33, then On the other hand, the other set of trials, shown in green, starts with a series of tails, then a head, which raises the proportion to 0.2, etc. The proportion of heads is quite variable at first. However, in the long run, and as the number of tosses increases, the proportion of heads stabilizes around 0.5. We say that 0.5 is the probability of a head. Please distinguish between random and haphazard (chaos). At first glance they might seem to be the same because neither of their outcomes can be anticipated with certainty. Proportion of heads Number of throws Figure 2. It is important that you know that the proportion of heads in a small number of tosses can be far from the probability. Probability describes only what happens in the long run. How a fair coin lands when it is tossed is an example of a random event. One cannot predict perfectly whether the coin will land heads or tails. However, in repeated tosses, the fraction of times the coin lands heads will tend to settle down to a limit of 50%. The outcome of an individual toss is not perfectly predictable, but the longterm average behaviour is predictable. Thus, it is reasonable to consider the outcome of tossing a fair coin to be random. Imagine the following scenario: I drive every day to school. Shortly before school, there is a traffic light. It appears that it is always red when I get there. I collected data over the course of one year (80 school days) and considered the green light to be a success. Here is a partial table of the collected data. 57

3 2 Probability Day Light red green red green red red red Percentage green The first day it was red, so the proportion of success is 0% (0 out of ); the second day it was green, so the frequency is now 50% ( out of 2); the third day it was red again, so 33.3% ( out of 3), and so on. As we collect more data, the new measurement becomes a smaller and smaller fraction of the accumulated frequency, so, in the long run, the graph settles to the real chance of finding it green, which in this case is about 30%. The graph is shown below. Percentage success Number of times Actually, if you run a simulation for a longer period, you can see that it really stabilizes around 30%. See graph below. Percentage of success Number of times You have to observe here that the randomness in the experiment is not in the traffic light itself, as it is controlled by a timer. In fact, if the system works well, it may turn green at the same time every day. The randomness of the event is the time I arrive at the traffic light. The French Count Buffon ( ) tossed a coin 4040 times and received 2048 heads, i.e. a proportion of 50.69%. Also, the English statistician Karl Pearson ( ) tossed a coin times and received 2 02 heads, a 50.05% proportion for heads. Count Buffon 58

4 If we ask for the probability of finding the traffic light green in the above example, our answer will be about 30%. We base our answer on knowing that, in the long run, the fraction of time that the traffic light was green is 30%. We could also say that the long-run relative frequency of the green light settles down to about 30%. 2.2 Basic definitions Data is obtained by observing either uncontrolled events in nature or controlled situations in a laboratory. We use the term experiment to describe either method of data collection. An experiment is the process by which an observation (or measurement) is obtained. A random (chance) experiment is an experiment where there is uncertainty concerning which of two or more possible outcomes will result. Tossing a coin, rolling a die and observing the number on the top surface, counting cars at a traffic light when it turns green, measuring daily rainfall in a certain area, etc. are a few experiments in this sense of the word. A description of a random phenomenon in the language of mathematics is called a probability model. For example, when we toss a coin, we cannot know the outcome in advance. What do we know? We are willing to say that the outcome will be either heads or tails. Because the coin appears to be balanced, we believe that each of these outcomes has probability This description of coin tossing has two parts: A list of possible outcomes. A probability for each outcome. This two-part description is the starting point for a probability model. We will begin by describing the outcomes of a random phenomenon and learn how to assign probabilities to the outcomes by using one of the definitions of probability. The sample space S of a random experiment (or phenomenon) is the set of all possible outcomes. The notation for sample space could also be U (IB notation) or any other letter. For example, for one toss of a coin, the sample space is S 5 {heads, tails}, or simply {h, t} Example Toss a coin twice (or two coins once) and record the results. What is the sample space? Solution S 5 {hh, ht, th, tt} 59

5 2 Probability Example 2 Toss a coin twice (or two coins once) and count the number of heads showing. What is the sample space? Solution S 5 {0,, 2} A simple event is the outcome we observe in a single repetition (trial) of the experiment. For example, an experiment is throwing a die and observing the number that appears on the top face. The simple events in this experiment are {}, {2}, {3}, {4}, {5} and {6}. Of course, the set of all these simple events is the sample space of the experiment. Set theory provides a foundation for all of mathematics. The language of probability is much the same as the language of set theory. Logical statements can be interpreted as statements about sets. This will enable us later to introduce a method of understanding how to set up probability problems that we need to tackle. We are now ready to define an event. There are several ways of looking at it, which in essence are all the same. An event is an outcome or a set of outcomes of a random experiment. With this understanding, we can also look at the event as a subset of the sample space or as a collection of simple events. Example 3 When rolling a standard six-sided die, what are the sets of event A observe an odd number, and event B observe a number less than 5. Solution Event A is the set {, 3, 5}. Event B is the set {, 2, 3, 4}. Sometimes it helps to visualize an experiment using some tools of set theory. Basically, there are several similarities between the ideas of set theory and probability, and it is very helpful when we see the connection. A simple but powerful diagram is the Venn diagram. The diagram shows the outcomes of the die rolling experiment. B A In general, in this book, we will use a rectangle to represent the sample space and closed curves to represent events, as shown in Example 3. To understand the definitions more clearly, let s look at the following additional example. 520

6 Example 4 Suppose we choose one card at random from a deck of 52 playing cards, what is the sample space S? Solution S 5 {A, 2, K, A, 2, K, A, 2, K, A, 2, K } Some events of interest: K 5 event of king 5{K, K, K, K } H 5 event of heart 5 {A, 2, K } J 5 event of jack or better 5 {J, J, J, J, Q, Q, Q, Q, K, K, K, K, A, A, A, A } Q 5 event of queen 5 {Q, Q, Q, Q } S J J J K K K Q K A K Q Q A Q Q J 2 4 H Some useful set theory results Set operations have a number of properties, which are basic consequences of the definitions. Some examples are: A B 5 B A (A9)9 5 A A S 5 A A S 5 S A A9 5 [ A A9 5 S S is the sample space and [ is the empty set. Two mainly valuable properties are known as De Morgan s laws, which state that: (A B)9 5 A9 B9 (A B)9 5 A9 B9 A (B C ) 5 (A B) (A C ) And finally A (B C ) 5 (A B) (A C ) Example 5 Toss a coin three times and record the results. Show the event observing two heads as a Venn diagram. Solution The sample space is made up of 8 possible outcomes such as hhh, hht, tht, etc. S ttt hhh tth A hht thh hth tht htt Observing exactly two heads is an event with three elements: {hht, hth, thh}. 52

7 3 2 Probability Tree diagrams, tables and grids In an experiment to check the blood types of patients, the experiment can be thought of as a two-stage experiment: first we identify the type of the blood and then we classify the Rh factor or 2. The simple events in this experiment can be counted using another tool, the tree diagram, which is extremely powerful and helpful in solving probability problems. Blood type Rh factor Outcome A B AB O A A B B AB AB O O Our sample space in this experiment is the set {A, A2, B, B2, AB, AB2, O, O2} as we can read from the last column. This data can also be arranged in a probability table: Blood type Rh factor A B AB O Positive A B AB O Negative A2 B2 AB2 O2 Or using a 2-dimensional grid as shown right: B A B AB O O Example 6 Two tetrahedral dice, one blue and one yellow, are rolled. List the elements of the following events: T 5 {3 appears on at least one die} B 5 {the blue die is a 3} S 5 {sum of the dice is a six}

8 Solution 4 S B 3 T Blue die Yellow die T 5 {(, 3), (2, 3), (3, 3), (4, 3), (3, 4), (3, 2), (3, )} B 5 {(, 3), (2, 3), (3, 3), (4, 3)} S 5 {(2, 4), (3, 3), (4, 2)} Exercise 2. and 2.2 In a large school, a student is selected at random. Give a reasonable sample space for answers to each of the following questions: a) Are you left-handed or right-handed? b) What is your height in centimetres? c) How many minutes did you study last night? 2 We throw a coin and a standard six-sided die and we record the number and the face that appear in that order. For example, (5, h) represents a 5 on the die and a head on the coin. Find the sample space. 3 We draw cards from a deck of 52 playing cards. a) List the sample space if we draw one card at a time. b) List the sample space if we draw two cards at a time. c) How many outcomes do you have in each of the experiments above? 4 Tim carried out an experiment where he tossed 20 coins together and observed the number of heads showing. He repeated this experiment 0 times and got the following results:, 9, 0, 8, 3, 9, 6, 7, 0, a) Use Tim s data to get the probability of obtaining a head. b) He tossed the 20 coins for the th time. How many heads should he expect to get? c) He tossed the coins 000 times. How many heads should he expect to see? 5 In the game Dungeons and Dragons, a four-sided die with sides marked with, 2, 3 and 4 spots is used. The intelligence of the player is determined by rolling the die twice and adding to the sum of the spots. a) What is the sample space for rolling the die twice? (Record the spots on the st and 2nd throws.) b) What is the sample space for the intelligence of the player? 523

9 2 Probability 6 A box contains three balls, blue, green and yellow. You run an experiment where you draw a ball, look at its colour and then replace it and draw a second ball. a) What is the sample space of this experiment? b) What is the event of drawing yellow first? c) What is the event of drawing the same colour twice? 7 Repeat the same exercise as in question 6 above, without replacing the first ball. 8 Nick flips a coin three times and each time he notes whether it is heads or tails. a) What is the sample space of this experiment? b) What is the event that heads occur more often than tails? 9 Franz lives in Vienna. He and his family decided that their next vacation will be to either Italy or Hungary. If they go to Italy, they can fly, drive or take the train. If they go to Hungary, they will drive or take a boat. Letting the outcome of the experiment be the location of their vacation and their mode of travel, list all the points in the sample space. Also list the sample space of the event fly to destination. 0 A hospital codes patients according to whether they have health insurance or no insurance, and according to their condition. The condition of the patient is rated as good (g), fair (f ), serious (s), or critical (c). The clerk at the front desk marks 0, for non-insured patients, and for insured, and uses one of the letters for the condition. So, (, c) means an insured patient with critical condition. a) List the sample space of this experiment. b) What is the event not insured, in serious or critical condition? c) What is the event patient in good or fair condition? d) What is the event patient has insurance? A social study investigates people for different characteristics. One part of the study classifies people according to gender (G 5 female, G 2 5 male), drinking habits (K 5 abstain, K 2 5 drinks occasionally, K 3 5 drinks frequently), and marital status (M 5 married, M 2 5 single, M 3 5 divorced, M 4 5 widowed). a) List the elements of an appropriate sample space for observing a person in this study. b) Define the following events: A 5 the person is a male, B 5 the person drinks, and C 5 the person is single List the elements of each A, B and C. c) Interpret the following events in the context of this situation: A B; A C; C9; A B C; A9 B. 2 Cars leaving the highway can take a right turn (R), left turn (L), or go straight (S). You are collecting data on traffic patterns at this intersection and you group your observations by taking four cars at a time every 5 minutes. a) List a few outcomes in your sample space U. How many are there? b) List the outcomes in the event that all cars go in the same direction. c) List the outcomes that only two cars turn right. d) List the outcomes that only two cars go in the same direction. 3 You are collecting data on traffic at an intersection for cars leaving a highway. Your task is to collect information about the size of the vehicle: truck (T), bus (B), car (C). You also have to record whether the driver has the safety belt on (SY) or no safety belt (SN), as well as whether the headlights are on (O) or off (F). a) List the outcomes of your sample space, U. b) List the outcomes of the event SY that the driver has the safety belt on. 524

10 c) List the outcomes of the event C that the vehicle you are recording is a car. d) List the outcomes of the event in C SY, C9, and C SY. 4 Many electric systems use a built in back-up system so that the equipment using the system will work even if some parts fail. Such a system is given in the diagram below. B A C Two parts of this system are installed in parallel, so that the system will work if at least one of them works. If we code a working system by and a failing system by 0, then one of the outcomes would be (, 0, ), which means parts A and C work while B failed. a) List the outcomes of your sample space, U. b) List the outcomes of the event X that exactly 2 of the parts work. c) List the outcomes of the event Y that at least 2 of the parts work? d) List the outcomes of the event Z that the system functions. e) List the outcomes of the events: Z9, X Z, X Z, Y Z, and Y Z. 5 Your school library has 5 copies of George Polya s How To Solve It book. Copies and 2 are first-edition, and copies 3, 4 and 5 are second edition. You are searching for a first-edition book, and you will stop when you find a copy. For example, if you find copy 2 immediately, then the outcome is 2. Outcome 542 represents the outcome that a first edition was found on the third attempt. a) List the outcomes of your sample space, U. b) List the outcomes of the event A that two books must be searched. c) List the outcomes of the event B that at least two books must be searched. d) List the outcomes of the event C that copy is found. 2.3 Probability assignments There are a few theories of probability that assign meaning to statements like the probability that A occurs is p%. In this book, we will primarily examine only the relative frequency theory. In essence, we will follow the idea that probability is the long-run proportion of repetitions on which an event occurs. This allows us to merge two concepts into one. Equally likely outcomes In the theory of equally likely outcomes, probability has to do with symmetries and the indistinguishability of outcomes. If a given experiment or trial has n possible outcomes among which there is no preference, they are equally likely. The probability of each outcome is then 00% n or n. For example, if a coin is balanced well, there is no reason for it to land heads in preference to tails when it is tossed, so, 525

11 2 Probability In all theories, probability is on a scale of 0% to 00%. Probability and chance are synonymous. S 526 A No matter how little a chance you think an event has, there is no such thing as negative probability. No matter how large a chance you think an event has, there is no such thing as a probability larger than! B accordingly, the probability that the coin lands heads is equal to the probability that it lands tails, and both are 00% 5 50%. Similarly, if 2 a die is fair, the chance that when it is rolled it lands with the side with on top is the same as the chance that it shows 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6: 00% 6 or. 6 In the theory of equally likely outcomes, probabilities are between 0% and 00%. If an event consists of more than one possible outcome, the chance of the event is the number of ways it can occur divided by the total number of things that could occur. For example, the chance that a die lands showing an even number on top is the number of ways it could land showing an even number (2, 4 or 6) divided by the total number of things that could occur (6, namely showing, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6). Frequency theory In the frequency theory, probability is the limit of the relative frequency with which an event occurs in repeated trials. Relative frequencies are always between 0% and 00%. According to the frequency theory of probability, the probability that A occurs is p% means that if you repeat the experiment over and over again, independently and under essentially identical conditions, the percentage of the time that A occurs will converge to p. For example, to say that the chance a coin lands heads is 50% means that if you toss the coin over and over again, independently, the ratio of the number of times the coin lands heads to the total number of tosses approaches a limiting value of 50%, as the number of tosses grows. Because the ratio of heads to tosses is always between 0% and 00%, when the probability exists it must be between 0% and 00%. Using Venn diagrams and the equally likely concept, we can say that the probability of any event is the number of elements in an event A divided by the total number of elements in the sample space S. This is equivalent to saying: P(A) 5 n(a), where n(a) represents the number of outcomes in A n(s ) and n(s) represents the total number of outcomes. So, in Example 5, the probability of observing exactly two heads is: P(2 heads) 5 _ 3 8. Probability rules Regardless of which theory we subscribe to, the probability rules apply. Rule Any probability is a number between 0 and, i.e. the probability P(A) of any event A satisfies 0 < P(A) <. If the probability of any event is 0, the event never occurs. Likewise, if the probability is, it always occurs. In rolling a standard die, it is impossible to get the number 9, so P(9) 5 0. Also, the probability of observing any integer between and 6, inclusive, is. Rule 2 All possible outcomes together must have a probability of, i.e. the probability of the sample space S is : P(S ) 5. Informally, this is sometimes called the something has to happen rule.

12 Rule 3 If two events have no outcomes in common, the probability that one or the other occurs is the sum of their individual probabilities. Two events that have no outcomes in common, and hence can never occur together, are called disjoint events or mutually exclusive events. P(A or B) 5 P(A) P(B) This is the addition rule for mutually exclusive events. For example, in tossing three coins, the events of getting exactly two heads or exactly two tails are disjoint, and hence the probability of getting exactly two heads or two tails is 3 _ 8 3 _ _ _ 4. S hhh B htt tth tht Additionally, we can always add the probabilities of outcomes because they are always disjoint. A trial cannot come out in two different ways at the same time. This will give you a way to check whether the probabilities you assigned are legitimate. Rule 4 Suppose that the probability that you receive a 7 on your IB exam is 0.2, then the probability of not receiving a 7 on the exam is 0.8. The event that contains the outcomes not in A is called the complement of A, and is denoted by A9. A A hth ttt hht thh A You have to be careful with these rules. By the something has to happen rule, the total of the probabilities of all possible outcomes must be. This is so because they are disjoint, and their sum covers all the elements of the sample space. Suppose someone reports the following probabilities for students in your high school (4 years). If the probability that a grade, 2, 3 or 4 student is chosen at random from the high school is 0.24, 0.24, 0.25 and 0.9 respectively, with no other possibilities, you should know immediately that there is something wrong. These probabilities add up to Similarly, if someone claims that these probabilities are 0.24, 0.28, 0.25, 0.26 respectively, there is also something wrong. These probabilities add up to.03, which is more than. P(A9) 5 2 P(A), or P(A) 5 2 P(A9). Example 7 Data for traffic violations was collected in a certain country and a summary is given below: Age group 8 20 years 2 29 years years Over 40 years Probability What is the probability that the offender is a) in the youngest age group, b) between 2 and 40, and c) younger than 40? 527

13 2 Probability Solution Each probability is between 0 and, and the probabilities add up to. Therefore, this is a legitimate assignment of probabilities. a) The probability that the offender is in the youngest group is 6%. b) The probability that the driver is in the group 2 to 39 years is c) The probability that a driver is younger than 40 years is Example 8 It is a striking fact that when people create codes for their cellphones, the first digits follow distributions very similar to the following one: First digit Probability a) Find the probabilities of the following three events: A 5 {first digit is } B 5 {first digit is more than 5} C 5 {first digit is an odd number} b) Find the probability that the first digit is (i) or greater than 5, (ii) not, and (iii) an odd number or a number larger than 5. Solution a) From the table: P(A) P(B) 5 P(6) P(7) P(8) P(9) P(C ) 5 P() P(3) P(5) P(7) P(9) Hint: Notice here that P(B or C ) is not the sum of P(B ) and P(C ) because B and C are not disjoint. b) (i) Since A and B are mutually exclusive, by the addition rule, the probability that the first digit is or greater than 5 is P(A or B ) (ii) Using the complement rule, the probability that the first digit is not is P(A9) 5 2 P(A) (iii) The probability that the first digit is an odd number or a number larger than 5: P(B or C ) 5 P() P(3) P(5) P(6) P(7) P(8) P(9)

14 Equally likely outcomes In some cases we are able to assume that individual outcomes are equally likely because of some balance in the experiment. Tossing a balanced coin renders heads or tails equally likely, with each having a probability of 50%, and rolling a standard balanced die gives the numbers from to 6 as equally likely, with each having a probability of _ 6. Suppose in Example 8 we consider all the digits to be equally likely to happen, then our table would be: First digit Probability P(A) 5 0. P(B) 5 P(6) P(7) P(8) P(9) P(C ) 5 P() P(3) P(5) P(7) P(9) Also, by the complement rule, the probability that the first digit is not is P(A9) 5 2 P(A) dimensional grids are also very helpful tools that are used to visualize 2-stage or sequential probability models. For example, consider rolling a normal unbiased cubical die twice. Here are some events and how to use the grid in calculating their probabilities: 6 P (at least one six) 36 5 Second roll P (same number) First roll If we are interested in the probability that at least one roll shows a 6, we count the points on the column corresponding to 6 on the first roll and the points on the row corresponding to 6 on the second roll observing naturally that the point in the corner should not be counted twice. If we are interested in the number showing on both rolls to be the same, then we count the points on the diagonal as shown. Finally, if we are interested in the probability that the first roll shows a number larger than the second roll, then we pick the points below the diagonal. Hence, P(first number. second number)

15 2 Probability R 4 R Geometric probability Some cases give rise to interpreting events as areas in the plane. Take for example shooting at a circular target at random. What is the probability of hitting the central part? The probability of hitting the central part is given by p ( R 4 ) 2 P 5 pr Example 9 Lydia and Rania agreed to meet at the museum quarter between 2:00 and 3:00. The first person to arrive will wait 5 minutes. If the second person does not show up, the first person will leave and they meet afterwards. Assuming that their arrivals are at random, what is the probability that they meet? Solution If Lydia arrives x minutes after 2:00 and Rania arrives y minutes after 2:00, then the condition for them to meet is x 2 y < 5, and x < 60, y < 60. Geometrically, the outcomes of their encounter region is given in the shaded region in the diagram right. The area for each triangle is _ 2 bh 5 _ 2 (45)2, so, the shaded area is The probability they meet is therefore (45) 2 2 (45) Probability calculation for equally likely outcomes using counting principles In an experiment where all outcomes are equally likely, the theoretical probability of an event A is given by P(A) 5 n(a) n(s ) where n(a) is the number of outcomes that make up the event A, and n(s ) is the total number of outcomes in the sample space. The new ideas we want to discuss here involve the calculation of n(a) and n(s). Such calculations will involve what you learned in Chapter 4 about counting principles. 530

16 Example 0 In a group of 8 students, eight are females. What is the probability of choosing five students a) with all girls? b) with three girls and two boys? c) with at least one boy? Solution The total number of outcomes is the number of ways we can choose 5 out of the 8 students. So n(s ) 5 ( 8 5 ) a) This event will require that we pick our group from among the 8 girls. So, n(a) 5 ( 8 5 ) 5 56 P(A) b) This event will require that we pick three out of the 8 girls, and at the same time, we pick 2 out of the 0 boys. So, using the multiplication principle, n(b) 5 ( 8 3 ) ( 0 2 ) P(B) Note: Did you observe that ( 8 5 ) 5 ( 8 3 )? Why? c) This event can be approached in two ways: To have at least boy means that we can have, 2, 3, 4 or 5 boys. These are mutually exclusive, so the probability in question is the sum P(C ) 5 ( 0 ) ( 8 4 ) ( 0 2 ) ( 8 3 ) ( 0 3 ) ( 8 2 ) ( 0 4 ) ( 8 ) ( 0 5 ) ( 8 ( 8 5 ) 0 ) To recognize that at least boy is the complement of no boys at all, i.e. 0 boys or all 5 girls. P(C ) 5 2 P(A) Example A deck of playing cards has 52 cards. In a game, the player is given five cards. Find the probability of the player having a) three cards of one denomination and two cards of another (three 7s and two Js for example). 53

17 2 Probability This game can be played at two stages, First, the player is given five cards, and then he/she can decide to exchange some of the cards. (The cards exchanged are discarded and not returned to the deck!) A player was given the following hand: Q, Q, Q, 4, 9. She decided to change the last two cards. Find the probability of the player having b) three cards of one denomination and two cards of another c) four queens. Solution a) The sample space consists of all possible 5-card hands that can be given out: n(s ) 5 ( 52 5 ) Call the event of interest A. As there are 3 denominations in the deck of cards then there are 3 choices for the first required denomination. Once a denomination is chosen, say 9, then there are ( 4 3 ) ways of choosing 3 cards out of the four. Using the multiplication rule, there are 3 ( 4 3 ) ways of choosing 3 cards of the first denomination. We are now left with 2 possible denominations for the second one, each can give us ( 4 2 ) ways of getting two of the cards, and hence using the multiplication rule, there are 2 ( 2 4 ) ways of choosing the cards for the second denomination. Again using the multiplication rule we will have [ 3 ( 4 3 ) ] [ 2 ( 4 2 ) ] ways of choosing the first and second denominations. The requested probability is then P(A) b) Since we have 3 queens, then we need only look for 2 cards of a different denomination. Now, there are only 47 cards left in the deck because we had 5 already. So the sample space has n(s ) 5 ( 47 2 ) 5 08 ways of getting the rest of the 5 cards. The other cards could be two 4 s, two 9 s or two of the rest of the 0 denominations. We have ( 3 2 ) 5 3 ways of getting two 4 s since 4 is already discarded. We also have ( 3 2 ) 5 3 ways to get two 9 s. Or, for each of the other 0 denominations (no Q, no 4 and no 9), we have ( 4 2 ) 5 6 different ways of getting two of them, i.e. we have 0 ( 4 2 ) 5 60 different ways of getting two cards of the same denomination other than Q, 4 or 9. So, the total number of ways of getting two cards of the same denomination is ways. So, the required probability is P(A) 5 n(a) n(s )

18 c) To have 4 Q s we only have to look for one, and there is only one way of getting the missing Q. That leaves us with one card to be chosen from the 46 cards left. 46 ways! Therefore, P(A) Exercise 2.3 In a simple experiment, chips with integers 20 inclusive were placed in a box and one chip was picked at random. a) What is the probability that the number drawn is a multiple of 3? b) What is the probability that the number drawn is not a multiple of 4? 2 The probability an event A happens is a) What is the probability that it does not happen? b) What is the probability that it may or may not happen? 3 You are playing with an ordinary deck of 52 cards by drawing cards at random and looking at them. a) Find the probability that the card you draw is (i) the ace of hearts (ii) the ace of hearts or any spade (iii) an ace or any heart (iv) not a face card. b) Now you draw the ten of diamonds, put it on the table and draw a second card. What is the probability that the second card is (i) the ace of hearts? (ii) not a face card? c) Now you draw the ten of diamonds, return it to the deck and draw a second card. What is the probability that the second card is (i) the ace of hearts? (ii) not a face card? 4 On Monday morning, my class wanted to know how many hours students spent studying on Sunday night. They stopped schoolmates at random as they arrived and asked each, How many hours did you study last night? Here are the answers of the sample they chose on Monday, 4 January, Number of hours Number of students a) Find the probability that a student spent less than three hours studying Sunday night. b) Find the probability that a student studied for two or three hours. c) Find the probability that a student studied less than six hours. 5 We throw a coin and a standard six-sided die and we record the number and the face that appear. Find a) the probability of having a number larger than 3 b) the probability that we receive a head and a 6. 6 A die is constructed in a way that a has the chance to occur twice as often as any other number. a) Find the probability that a 5 appears. b) Find the probability an odd number will occur. 533

19 2 Probability 7 You are given two fair dice to roll in an experiment. a) Your first task is to report the numbers you observe. (i) What is the sample space of your experiment? (ii) What is the probability that the two numbers are the same? (iii) What is the probability that the two numbers differ by 2? (iv) What is the probability that the two numbers are not the same? b) In a second stage, your task is to report the sum of the numbers that appear. (i) What is the probability that the sum is? (ii) What is the probability that the sum is 9? (iii) What is the probability that the sum is 8? (iv) What is the probability that the sum is 3? 8 The blood types of people can be one of four types: O, A, B or AB. The distribution of people with these types differs from one group of people to another. Here are the distributions of blood types for randomly chosen people in the US, China and Russia. Country Blood type O A B AB US ? China Russia ? 0.09 a) What is the probability of type AB in the US? b) Dirk lives in the US and has type B blood. What is the probability that a randomly chosen US citizen can donate blood to Dirk? (Type B can only receive from O and B.) c) What is the probability of randomly choosing an American and a Chinese (independently) with type O blood? d) What is the probability of randomly choosing an American, a Chinese and a Russian (independently) with type O blood? e) What is the probability of randomly choosing an American, a Chinese and a Russian (independently) with the same blood type? 9 In each of the following situations, state whether or not the given assignment of probabilities to individual outcomes is legitimate. Give reasons for your answer. a) A die is loaded such that the probability of each face is according to the following assignment (x is the number of spots on the upper face and P(x) is its probability.) x P(x) 0 _ 6 _ 3 _ 3 _ 6 0 b) A student at your school categorized in terms of gender and whether they are diploma candidates or not. P(female, diploma candidate) , P(female, not a diploma candidate) , P(male, diploma candidate) , P(male, not a diploma candidate) c) Draw a card from a deck of 52 cards (x is the suit of the card and P(x) is its probability). x Hearts Spades Diamonds Clubs P(x)

20 0 In Switzerland, there are three official mother tongues, German, French and Italian. You choose a Swiss at random and ask, What is your mother tongue? Here is the distribution of responses: Language German French Italian Other Probability ? a) What is the probability that a Swiss person s mother tongue is not one of the official ones? b) What is the probability that a Swiss person s mother tongue is not German? c) What is the probability that you choose two Swiss independent of each other and they both have German mother tongue? d) What is the probability that you choose two Swiss independent of each other and they both have the same mother tongue? The majority of messages are now spam. Choose a spam message at random. Here is the distribution of topics: Topic Adult Financial Health Leisure Products Scams Probability a) What is the probability of choosing a spam message that does not concern these topics? Parents are usually concerned with spam messages with adult content and scams. b) What is the probability that a randomly chosen spam falls into one of the other categories? n ( ( x n ), where x is also a positive integer. Determine the values of x (in terms of n) for which f (x) <. x ) 2 Consider n to be a positive integer. Let f (x) 5 3 Determine n in each of the following cases: a) ( n 2 ) 5 90 b) ( n 4 ) 5 ( n 8 ) 4 An experiment involves rolling a pair of dice, white and red, and recording the numbers that come up. Find the probability a) that the sum is greater than 8 b) that a number greater than 4 appears on the white die c) that at most a total of 5 appears. 5 Three books are picked from a shelf containing 5 novels, 3 science books and a thesaurus. What is the probability that a) the thesaurus is selected? b) two novels and a science book are selected? 6 Five cards are chosen at random from a deck of 52 cards. Find the probability that the set contains a) 3 kings b) 4 hearts and diamond. 7 A class consists of 0 girls and 2 boys. A team of 6 members is to be chosen at random. What is the probability that the team contains a) one boy? b) more boys than girls? 535

Probability. Ms. Weinstein Probability & Statistics

Probability. Ms. Weinstein Probability & Statistics Probability Ms. Weinstein Probability & Statistics Definitions Sample Space The sample space, S, of a random phenomenon is the set of all possible outcomes. Event An event is a set of outcomes of a random

More information

Class XII Chapter 13 Probability Maths. Exercise 13.1

Class XII Chapter 13 Probability Maths. Exercise 13.1 Exercise 13.1 Question 1: Given that E and F are events such that P(E) = 0.6, P(F) = 0.3 and P(E F) = 0.2, find P (E F) and P(F E). It is given that P(E) = 0.6, P(F) = 0.3, and P(E F) = 0.2 Question 2:

More information

Probability and Statistics. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Probability and Statistics. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Probability and Statistics Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 14.2 Probability Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Objectives What Is Probability? Calculating Probability by

More information

Such a description is the basis for a probability model. Here is the basic vocabulary we use.

Such a description is the basis for a probability model. Here is the basic vocabulary we use. 5.2.1 Probability Models When we toss a coin, we can t know the outcome in advance. What do we know? We are willing to say that the outcome will be either heads or tails. We believe that each of these

More information

PROBABILITY. 1. Introduction. Candidates should able to:

PROBABILITY. 1. Introduction. Candidates should able to: PROBABILITY Candidates should able to: evaluate probabilities in simple cases by means of enumeration of equiprobable elementary events (e.g for the total score when two fair dice are thrown), or by calculation

More information

heads 1/2 1/6 roll a die sum on 2 dice 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 heads tails 3/36 = 1/12 toss a coin trial: an occurrence

heads 1/2 1/6 roll a die sum on 2 dice 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 heads tails 3/36 = 1/12 toss a coin trial: an occurrence trial: an occurrence roll a die toss a coin sum on 2 dice sample space: all the things that could happen in each trial 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 heads tails 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 example of an outcome:

More information

STAT 155 Introductory Statistics. Lecture 11: Randomness and Probability Model

STAT 155 Introductory Statistics. Lecture 11: Randomness and Probability Model The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL HILL STAT 155 Introductory Statistics Lecture 11: Randomness and Probability Model 10/5/06 Lecture 11 1 The Monty Hall Problem Let s Make A Deal: a game show

More information

STOR 155 Introductory Statistics. Lecture 10: Randomness and Probability Model

STOR 155 Introductory Statistics. Lecture 10: Randomness and Probability Model The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL HILL STOR 155 Introductory Statistics Lecture 10: Randomness and Probability Model 10/6/09 Lecture 10 1 The Monty Hall Problem Let s Make A Deal: a game show

More information

RANDOM EXPERIMENTS AND EVENTS

RANDOM EXPERIMENTS AND EVENTS Random Experiments and Events 18 RANDOM EXPERIMENTS AND EVENTS In day-to-day life we see that before commencement of a cricket match two captains go for a toss. Tossing of a coin is an activity and getting

More information

Grade 6 Math Circles Fall Oct 14/15 Probability

Grade 6 Math Circles Fall Oct 14/15 Probability 1 Faculty of Mathematics Waterloo, Ontario Centre for Education in Mathematics and Computing Grade 6 Math Circles Fall 2014 - Oct 14/15 Probability Probability is the likelihood of an event occurring.

More information

Lecture 6 Probability

Lecture 6 Probability Lecture 6 Probability Example: When you toss a coin, there are only two possible outcomes, heads and tails. What if we toss a coin two times? Figure below shows the results of tossing a coin 5000 times

More information

Math 146 Statistics for the Health Sciences Additional Exercises on Chapter 3

Math 146 Statistics for the Health Sciences Additional Exercises on Chapter 3 Math 46 Statistics for the Health Sciences Additional Exercises on Chapter 3 Student Name: Find the indicated probability. ) If you flip a coin three times, the possible outcomes are HHH HHT HTH HTT THH

More information

Name: Class: Date: 6. An event occurs, on average, every 6 out of 17 times during a simulation. The experimental probability of this event is 11

Name: Class: Date: 6. An event occurs, on average, every 6 out of 17 times during a simulation. The experimental probability of this event is 11 Class: Date: Sample Mastery # Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.. One repetition of an experiment is known as a(n) random variable expected value

More information

November 6, Chapter 8: Probability: The Mathematics of Chance

November 6, Chapter 8: Probability: The Mathematics of Chance Chapter 8: Probability: The Mathematics of Chance November 6, 2013 Last Time Crystallographic notation Groups Crystallographic notation The first symbol is always a p, which indicates that the pattern

More information

Intermediate Math Circles November 1, 2017 Probability I

Intermediate Math Circles November 1, 2017 Probability I Intermediate Math Circles November 1, 2017 Probability I Probability is the study of uncertain events or outcomes. Games of chance that involve rolling dice or dealing cards are one obvious area of application.

More information

MATH CALCULUS & STATISTICS/BUSN - PRACTICE EXAM #1 - SPRING DR. DAVID BRIDGE

MATH CALCULUS & STATISTICS/BUSN - PRACTICE EXAM #1 - SPRING DR. DAVID BRIDGE MATH 205 - CALCULUS & STATISTICS/BUSN - PRACTICE EXAM # - SPRING 2006 - DR. DAVID BRIDGE TRUE/FALSE. Write 'T' if the statement is true and 'F' if the statement is false. Tell whether the statement is

More information

Chapter 5: Probability: What are the Chances? Section 5.2 Probability Rules

Chapter 5: Probability: What are the Chances? Section 5.2 Probability Rules + Chapter 5: Probability: What are the Chances? Section 5.2 + Two-Way Tables and Probability When finding probabilities involving two events, a two-way table can display the sample space in a way that

More information

Contents 2.1 Basic Concepts of Probability Methods of Assigning Probabilities Principle of Counting - Permutation and Combination 39

Contents 2.1 Basic Concepts of Probability Methods of Assigning Probabilities Principle of Counting - Permutation and Combination 39 CHAPTER 2 PROBABILITY Contents 2.1 Basic Concepts of Probability 38 2.2 Probability of an Event 39 2.3 Methods of Assigning Probabilities 39 2.4 Principle of Counting - Permutation and Combination 39 2.5

More information

Chapter 6: Probability and Simulation. The study of randomness

Chapter 6: Probability and Simulation. The study of randomness Chapter 6: Probability and Simulation The study of randomness 6.1 Randomness Probability describes the pattern of chance outcomes. Probability is the basis of inference Meaning, the pattern of chance outcomes

More information

Probability. Dr. Zhang Fordham Univ.

Probability. Dr. Zhang Fordham Univ. Probability! Dr. Zhang Fordham Univ. 1 Probability: outline Introduction! Experiment, event, sample space! Probability of events! Calculate Probability! Through counting! Sum rule and general sum rule!

More information

Chapter 1. Probability

Chapter 1. Probability Chapter 1. Probability 1.1 Basic Concepts Scientific method a. For a given problem, we define measures that explains the problem well. b. Data is collected with observation and the measures are calculated.

More information

7.1 Experiments, Sample Spaces, and Events

7.1 Experiments, Sample Spaces, and Events 7.1 Experiments, Sample Spaces, and Events An experiment is an activity that has observable results. Examples: Tossing a coin, rolling dice, picking marbles out of a jar, etc. The result of an experiment

More information

CHAPTER 2 PROBABILITY. 2.1 Sample Space. 2.2 Events

CHAPTER 2 PROBABILITY. 2.1 Sample Space. 2.2 Events CHAPTER 2 PROBABILITY 2.1 Sample Space A probability model consists of the sample space and the way to assign probabilities. Sample space & sample point The sample space S, is the set of all possible outcomes

More information

Honors Statistics. 3. Review Homework C5#4. Conditional Probabilities. Chapter 5 Section 2 day s Notes.notebook. April 14, 2016.

Honors Statistics. 3. Review Homework C5#4. Conditional Probabilities. Chapter 5 Section 2 day s Notes.notebook. April 14, 2016. Honors Statistics Aug 23-8:26 PM 3. Review Homework C5#4 Conditional Probabilities Aug 23-8:31 PM 1 Apr 9-2:22 PM Nov 15-10:28 PM 2 Nov 9-5:30 PM Nov 9-5:34 PM 3 A Skip 43, 45 How do you want it - the

More information

I. WHAT IS PROBABILITY?

I. WHAT IS PROBABILITY? C HAPTER 3 PROAILITY Random Experiments I. WHAT IS PROAILITY? The weatherman on 10 o clock news program states that there is a 20% chance that it will snow tomorrow, a 65% chance that it will rain and

More information

Probability and Counting Rules. Chapter 3

Probability and Counting Rules. Chapter 3 Probability and Counting Rules Chapter 3 Probability as a general concept can be defined as the chance of an event occurring. Many people are familiar with probability from observing or playing games of

More information

4.1 Sample Spaces and Events

4.1 Sample Spaces and Events 4.1 Sample Spaces and Events An experiment is an activity that has observable results. Examples: Tossing a coin, rolling dice, picking marbles out of a jar, etc. The result of an experiment is called an

More information

Business Statistics. Chapter 4 Using Probability and Probability Distributions QMIS 120. Dr. Mohammad Zainal

Business Statistics. Chapter 4 Using Probability and Probability Distributions QMIS 120. Dr. Mohammad Zainal Department of Quantitative Methods & Information Systems Business Statistics Chapter 4 Using Probability and Probability Distributions QMIS 120 Dr. Mohammad Zainal Chapter Goals After completing this chapter,

More information

Week 3 Classical Probability, Part I

Week 3 Classical Probability, Part I Week 3 Classical Probability, Part I Week 3 Objectives Proper understanding of common statistical practices such as confidence intervals and hypothesis testing requires some familiarity with probability

More information

Exercise Class XI Chapter 16 Probability Maths

Exercise Class XI Chapter 16 Probability Maths Exercise 16.1 Question 1: Describe the sample space for the indicated experiment: A coin is tossed three times. A coin has two faces: head (H) and tail (T). When a coin is tossed three times, the total

More information

Probability - Chapter 4

Probability - Chapter 4 Probability - Chapter 4 In this chapter, you will learn about probability its meaning, how it is computed, and how to evaluate it in terms of the likelihood of an event actually happening. A cynical person

More information

CS 361: Probability & Statistics

CS 361: Probability & Statistics January 31, 2018 CS 361: Probability & Statistics Probability Probability theory Probability Reasoning about uncertain situations with formal models Allows us to compute probabilities Experiments will

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Study Guide for Test III (MATH 1630) Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Find the number of subsets of the set. 1) {x x is an even

More information

Math 147 Elementary Probability/Statistics I Additional Exercises on Chapter 4: Probability

Math 147 Elementary Probability/Statistics I Additional Exercises on Chapter 4: Probability Math 147 Elementary Probability/Statistics I Additional Exercises on Chapter 4: Probability Student Name: Find the indicated probability. 1) If you flip a coin three times, the possible outcomes are HHH

More information

Chapter 1. Probability

Chapter 1. Probability Chapter 1. Probability 1.1 Basic Concepts Scientific method a. For a given problem, we define measures that explains the problem well. b. Data is collected with observation and the measures are calculated.

More information

Math 227 Elementary Statistics. Bluman 5 th edition

Math 227 Elementary Statistics. Bluman 5 th edition Math 227 Elementary Statistics Bluman 5 th edition CHAPTER 4 Probability and Counting Rules 2 Objectives Determine sample spaces and find the probability of an event using classical probability or empirical

More information

ECON 214 Elements of Statistics for Economists

ECON 214 Elements of Statistics for Economists ECON 214 Elements of Statistics for Economists Session 4 Probability Lecturer: Dr. Bernardin Senadza, Dept. of Economics Contact Information: bsenadza@ug.edu.gh College of Education School of Continuing

More information

Chapter 3: PROBABILITY

Chapter 3: PROBABILITY Chapter 3 Math 3201 1 3.1 Exploring Probability: P(event) = Chapter 3: PROBABILITY number of outcomes favourable to the event total number of outcomes in the sample space An event is any collection of

More information

Page 1 of 22. Website: Mobile:

Page 1 of 22. Website:    Mobile: Exercise 15.1 Question 1: Complete the following statements: (i) Probability of an event E + Probability of the event not E =. (ii) The probability of an event that cannot happen is. Such as event is called.

More information

3 The multiplication rule/miscellaneous counting problems

3 The multiplication rule/miscellaneous counting problems Practice for Exam 1 1 Axioms of probability, disjoint and independent events 1 Suppose P (A 0, P (B 05 (a If A and B are independent, what is P (A B? What is P (A B? (b If A and B are disjoint, what is

More information

Section Introduction to Sets

Section Introduction to Sets Section 1.1 - Introduction to Sets Definition: A set is a well-defined collection of objects usually denoted by uppercase letters. Definition: The elements, or members, of a set are denoted by lowercase

More information

Probability. Probabilty Impossibe Unlikely Equally Likely Likely Certain

Probability. Probabilty Impossibe Unlikely Equally Likely Likely Certain PROBABILITY Probability The likelihood or chance of an event occurring If an event is IMPOSSIBLE its probability is ZERO If an event is CERTAIN its probability is ONE So all probabilities lie between 0

More information

Chapter 5 - Elementary Probability Theory

Chapter 5 - Elementary Probability Theory Chapter 5 - Elementary Probability Theory Historical Background Much of the early work in probability concerned games and gambling. One of the first to apply probability to matters other than gambling

More information

Chapter 8: Probability: The Mathematics of Chance

Chapter 8: Probability: The Mathematics of Chance Chapter 8: Probability: The Mathematics of Chance Free-Response 1. A spinner with regions numbered 1 to 4 is spun and a coin is tossed. Both the number spun and whether the coin lands heads or tails is

More information

Chapter 3: Elements of Chance: Probability Methods

Chapter 3: Elements of Chance: Probability Methods Chapter 3: Elements of Chance: Methods Department of Mathematics Izmir University of Economics Week 3-4 2014-2015 Introduction In this chapter we will focus on the definitions of random experiment, outcome,

More information

STANDARD COMPETENCY : 1. To use the statistics rules, the rules of counting, and the characteristic of probability in problem solving.

STANDARD COMPETENCY : 1. To use the statistics rules, the rules of counting, and the characteristic of probability in problem solving. Worksheet 4 th Topic : PROBABILITY TIME : 4 X 45 minutes STANDARD COMPETENCY : 1. To use the statistics rules, the rules of counting, and the characteristic of probability in problem solving. BASIC COMPETENCY:

More information

Unit 11 Probability. Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4

Unit 11 Probability. Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Study Notes 11.1 Intro to Probability Unit 11 Probability Many events can t be predicted with total certainty. The best thing we can do is say how likely they are to happen, using the idea of probability.

More information

Applications of Probability

Applications of Probability Applications of Probability CK-12 Kaitlyn Spong Say Thanks to the Authors Click http://www.ck12.org/saythanks (No sign in required) To access a customizable version of this book, as well as other interactive

More information

Diamond ( ) (Black coloured) (Black coloured) (Red coloured) ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES

Diamond ( ) (Black coloured) (Black coloured) (Red coloured) ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES CHAPTER 15 PROBABILITY Points to Remember : 1. In the experimental approach to probability, we find the probability of the occurence of an event by actually performing the experiment a number of times

More information

The probability set-up

The probability set-up CHAPTER 2 The probability set-up 2.1. Introduction and basic theory We will have a sample space, denoted S (sometimes Ω) that consists of all possible outcomes. For example, if we roll two dice, the sample

More information

Chapter 4: Probability and Counting Rules

Chapter 4: Probability and Counting Rules Chapter 4: Probability and Counting Rules Before we can move from descriptive statistics to inferential statistics, we need to have some understanding of probability: Ch4: Probability and Counting Rules

More information

Raise your hand if you rode a bus within the past month. Record the number of raised hands.

Raise your hand if you rode a bus within the past month. Record the number of raised hands. 166 CHAPTER 3 PROBABILITY TOPICS Raise your hand if you rode a bus within the past month. Record the number of raised hands. Raise your hand if you answered "yes" to BOTH of the first two questions. Record

More information

Combinatorics: The Fine Art of Counting

Combinatorics: The Fine Art of Counting Combinatorics: The Fine Art of Counting Week 6 Lecture Notes Discrete Probability Note Binomial coefficients are written horizontally. The symbol ~ is used to mean approximately equal. Introduction and

More information

Probability. The MEnTe Program Math Enrichment through Technology. Title V East Los Angeles College

Probability. The MEnTe Program Math Enrichment through Technology. Title V East Los Angeles College Probability The MEnTe Program Math Enrichment through Technology Title V East Los Angeles College 2003 East Los Angeles College. All rights reserved. Topics Introduction Empirical Probability Theoretical

More information

COUNTING AND PROBABILITY

COUNTING AND PROBABILITY CHAPTER 9 COUNTING AND PROBABILITY It s as easy as 1 2 3. That s the saying. And in certain ways, counting is easy. But other aspects of counting aren t so simple. Have you ever agreed to meet a friend

More information

Name: Class: Date: Probability/Counting Multiple Choice Pre-Test

Name: Class: Date: Probability/Counting Multiple Choice Pre-Test Name: _ lass: _ ate: Probability/ounting Multiple hoice Pre-Test Multiple hoice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1 The dartboard has 8 sections of equal area.

More information

Define and Diagram Outcomes (Subsets) of the Sample Space (Universal Set)

Define and Diagram Outcomes (Subsets) of the Sample Space (Universal Set) 12.3 and 12.4 Notes Geometry 1 Diagramming the Sample Space using Venn Diagrams A sample space represents all things that could occur for a given event. In set theory language this would be known as the

More information

UNIT 4 APPLICATIONS OF PROBABILITY Lesson 1: Events. Instruction. Guided Practice Example 1

UNIT 4 APPLICATIONS OF PROBABILITY Lesson 1: Events. Instruction. Guided Practice Example 1 Guided Practice Example 1 Bobbi tosses a coin 3 times. What is the probability that she gets exactly 2 heads? Write your answer as a fraction, as a decimal, and as a percent. Sample space = {HHH, HHT,

More information

Fdaytalk.com. Outcomes is probable results related to an experiment

Fdaytalk.com. Outcomes is probable results related to an experiment EXPERIMENT: Experiment is Definite/Countable probable results Example: Tossing a coin Throwing a dice OUTCOMES: Outcomes is probable results related to an experiment Example: H, T Coin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

More information

Chapter 4: Introduction to Probability

Chapter 4: Introduction to Probability MTH 243 Chapter 4: Introduction to Probability Suppose that we found that one of our pieces of data was unusual. For example suppose our pack of M&M s only had 30 and that was 3.1 standard deviations below

More information

Probability (Devore Chapter Two)

Probability (Devore Chapter Two) Probability (Devore Chapter Two) 1016-351-01 Probability Winter 2011-2012 Contents 1 Axiomatic Probability 2 1.1 Outcomes and Events............................... 2 1.2 Rules of Probability................................

More information

Before giving a formal definition of probability, we explain some terms related to probability.

Before giving a formal definition of probability, we explain some terms related to probability. probability 22 INTRODUCTION In our day-to-day life, we come across statements such as: (i) It may rain today. (ii) Probably Rajesh will top his class. (iii) I doubt she will pass the test. (iv) It is unlikely

More information

1. How to identify the sample space of a probability experiment and how to identify simple events

1. How to identify the sample space of a probability experiment and how to identify simple events Statistics Chapter 3 Name: 3.1 Basic Concepts of Probability Learning objectives: 1. How to identify the sample space of a probability experiment and how to identify simple events 2. How to use the Fundamental

More information

Lesson 10: Using Simulation to Estimate a Probability

Lesson 10: Using Simulation to Estimate a Probability Lesson 10: Using Simulation to Estimate a Probability Classwork In previous lessons, you estimated probabilities of events by collecting data empirically or by establishing a theoretical probability model.

More information

The probability set-up

The probability set-up CHAPTER The probability set-up.1. Introduction and basic theory We will have a sample space, denoted S sometimes Ω that consists of all possible outcomes. For example, if we roll two dice, the sample space

More information

Unit 9: Probability Assignments

Unit 9: Probability Assignments Unit 9: Probability Assignments #1: Basic Probability In each of exercises 1 & 2, find the probability that the spinner shown would land on (a) red, (b) yellow, (c) blue. 1. 2. Y B B Y B R Y Y B R 3. Suppose

More information

CHAPTERS 14 & 15 PROBABILITY STAT 203

CHAPTERS 14 & 15 PROBABILITY STAT 203 CHAPTERS 14 & 15 PROBABILITY STAT 203 Where this fits in 2 Up to now, we ve mostly discussed how to handle data (descriptive statistics) and how to collect data. Regression has been the only form of statistical

More information

FALL 2012 MATH 1324 REVIEW EXAM 4

FALL 2012 MATH 1324 REVIEW EXAM 4 FALL 01 MATH 134 REVIEW EXAM 4 MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Write the sample space for the given experiment. 1) An ordinary die

More information

Week 1: Probability models and counting

Week 1: Probability models and counting Week 1: Probability models and counting Part 1: Probability model Probability theory is the mathematical toolbox to describe phenomena or experiments where randomness occur. To have a probability model

More information

STAT 430/510 Probability Lecture 3: Space and Event; Sample Spaces with Equally Likely Outcomes

STAT 430/510 Probability Lecture 3: Space and Event; Sample Spaces with Equally Likely Outcomes STAT 430/510 Probability Lecture 3: Space and Event; Sample Spaces with Equally Likely Outcomes Pengyuan (Penelope) Wang May 25, 2011 Review We have discussed counting techniques in Chapter 1. (Principle

More information

(a) Suppose you flip a coin and roll a die. Are the events obtain a head and roll a 5 dependent or independent events?

(a) Suppose you flip a coin and roll a die. Are the events obtain a head and roll a 5 dependent or independent events? Unit 6 Probability Name: Date: Hour: Multiplication Rule of Probability By the end of this lesson, you will be able to Understand Independence Use the Multiplication Rule for independent events Independent

More information

Probability - Grade 10 *

Probability - Grade 10 * OpenStax-CNX module: m32623 1 Probability - Grade 10 * Rory Adams Free High School Science Texts Project Sarah Blyth Heather Williams This work is produced by OpenStax-CNX and licensed under the Creative

More information

Probability Models. Section 6.2

Probability Models. Section 6.2 Probability Models Section 6.2 The Language of Probability What is random? Empirical means that it is based on observation rather than theorizing. Probability describes what happens in MANY trials. Example

More information

Algebra 2 Notes Section 10.1: Apply the Counting Principle and Permutations

Algebra 2 Notes Section 10.1: Apply the Counting Principle and Permutations Algebra 2 Notes Section 10.1: Apply the Counting Principle and Permutations Objective(s): Vocabulary: I. Fundamental Counting Principle: Two Events: Three or more Events: II. Permutation: (top of p. 684)

More information

APPENDIX 2.3: RULES OF PROBABILITY

APPENDIX 2.3: RULES OF PROBABILITY The frequentist notion of probability is quite simple and intuitive. Here, we ll describe some rules that govern how probabilities are combined. Not all of these rules will be relevant to the rest of this

More information

Probability Assignment

Probability Assignment Name Probability Assignment Student # Hr 1. An experiment consists of spinning the spinner one time. a. How many possible outcomes are there? b. List the sample space for the experiment. c. Determine the

More information

Probability and Counting Techniques

Probability and Counting Techniques Probability and Counting Techniques Diana Pell (Multiplication Principle) Suppose that a task consists of t choices performed consecutively. Suppose that choice 1 can be performed in m 1 ways; for each

More information

Empirical (or statistical) probability) is based on. The empirical probability of an event E is the frequency of event E.

Empirical (or statistical) probability) is based on. The empirical probability of an event E is the frequency of event E. Probability and Statistics Chapter 3 Notes Section 3-1 I. Probability Experiments. A. When weather forecasters say There is a 90% chance of rain tomorrow, or a doctor says There is a 35% chance of a successful

More information

Independent and Mutually Exclusive Events

Independent and Mutually Exclusive Events Independent and Mutually Exclusive Events By: OpenStaxCollege Independent and mutually exclusive do not mean the same thing. Independent Events Two events are independent if the following are true: P(A

More information

Probability: Terminology and Examples Spring January 1, / 22

Probability: Terminology and Examples Spring January 1, / 22 Probability: Terminology and Examples 18.05 Spring 2014 January 1, 2017 1 / 22 Board Question Deck of 52 cards 13 ranks: 2, 3,..., 9, 10, J, Q, K, A 4 suits:,,,, Poker hands Consists of 5 cards A one-pair

More information

Math Exam 2 Review. NOTE: For reviews of the other sections on Exam 2, refer to the first page of WIR #4 and #5.

Math Exam 2 Review. NOTE: For reviews of the other sections on Exam 2, refer to the first page of WIR #4 and #5. Math 166 Spring 2007 c Heather Ramsey Page 1 Math 166 - Exam 2 Review NOTE: For reviews of the other sections on Exam 2, refer to the first page of WIR #4 and #5. Section 7.1 - Experiments, Sample Spaces,

More information

3 The multiplication rule/miscellaneous counting problems

3 The multiplication rule/miscellaneous counting problems Practice for Exam 1 1 Axioms of probability, disjoint and independent events 1. Suppose P (A) = 0.4, P (B) = 0.5. (a) If A and B are independent, what is P (A B)? What is P (A B)? (b) If A and B are disjoint,

More information

Math Exam 2 Review. NOTE: For reviews of the other sections on Exam 2, refer to the first page of WIR #4 and #5.

Math Exam 2 Review. NOTE: For reviews of the other sections on Exam 2, refer to the first page of WIR #4 and #5. Math 166 Spring 2007 c Heather Ramsey Page 1 Math 166 - Exam 2 Review NOTE: For reviews of the other sections on Exam 2, refer to the first page of WIR #4 and #5. Section 7.1 - Experiments, Sample Spaces,

More information

Review Questions on Ch4 and Ch5

Review Questions on Ch4 and Ch5 Review Questions on Ch4 and Ch5 1. Find the mean of the distribution shown. x 1 2 P(x) 0.40 0.60 A) 1.60 B) 0.87 C) 1.33 D) 1.09 2. A married couple has three children, find the probability they are all

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Statistics Homework Ch 5 Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Provide an appropriate response. 1) A coin is tossed. Find the probability

More information

Section : Combinations and Permutations

Section : Combinations and Permutations Section 11.1-11.2: Combinations and Permutations Diana Pell A construction crew has three members. A team of two must be chosen for a particular job. In how many ways can the team be chosen? How many words

More information

Chapter 1: Sets and Probability

Chapter 1: Sets and Probability Chapter 1: Sets and Probability Section 1.3-1.5 Recap: Sample Spaces and Events An is an activity that has observable results. An is the result of an experiment. Example 1 Examples of experiments: Flipping

More information

Fundamentals of Probability

Fundamentals of Probability Fundamentals of Probability Introduction Probability is the likelihood that an event will occur under a set of given conditions. The probability of an event occurring has a value between 0 and 1. An impossible

More information

CHAPTER 7 Probability

CHAPTER 7 Probability CHAPTER 7 Probability 7.1. Sets A set is a well-defined collection of distinct objects. Welldefined means that we can determine whether an object is an element of a set or not. Distinct means that we can

More information

Key Concepts. Theoretical Probability. Terminology. Lesson 11-1

Key Concepts. Theoretical Probability. Terminology. Lesson 11-1 Key Concepts Theoretical Probability Lesson - Objective Teach students the terminology used in probability theory, and how to make calculations pertaining to experiments where all outcomes are equally

More information

Module 4 Project Maths Development Team Draft (Version 2)

Module 4 Project Maths Development Team Draft (Version 2) 5 Week Modular Course in Statistics & Probability Strand 1 Module 4 Set Theory and Probability It is often said that the three basic rules of probability are: 1. Draw a picture 2. Draw a picture 3. Draw

More information

Probability is often written as a simplified fraction, but it can also be written as a decimal or percent.

Probability is often written as a simplified fraction, but it can also be written as a decimal or percent. CHAPTER 1: PROBABILITY 1. Introduction to Probability L EARNING TARGET: I CAN DETERMINE THE PROBABILITY OF AN EVENT. What s the probability of flipping heads on a coin? Theoretically, it is 1/2 1 way to

More information

Mathematics 'A' level Module MS1: Statistics 1. Probability. The aims of this lesson are to enable you to. calculate and understand probability

Mathematics 'A' level Module MS1: Statistics 1. Probability. The aims of this lesson are to enable you to. calculate and understand probability Mathematics 'A' level Module MS1: Statistics 1 Lesson Three Aims The aims of this lesson are to enable you to calculate and understand probability apply the laws of probability in a variety of situations

More information

Probability. The Bag Model

Probability. The Bag Model Probability The Bag Model Imagine a bag (or box) containing balls of various kinds having various colors for example. Assume that a certain fraction p of these balls are of type A. This means N = total

More information

XXII Probability. 4. The odds of being accepted in Mathematics at McGill University are 3 to 8. Find the probability of being accepted.

XXII Probability. 4. The odds of being accepted in Mathematics at McGill University are 3 to 8. Find the probability of being accepted. MATHEMATICS 20-BNJ-05 Topics in Mathematics Martin Huard Winter 204 XXII Probability. Find the sample space S along with n S. a) The face cards are removed from a regular deck and then card is selected

More information

MTH 103 H Final Exam. 1. I study and I pass the course is an example of a. (a) conjunction (b) disjunction. (c) conditional (d) connective

MTH 103 H Final Exam. 1. I study and I pass the course is an example of a. (a) conjunction (b) disjunction. (c) conditional (d) connective MTH 103 H Final Exam Name: 1. I study and I pass the course is an example of a (a) conjunction (b) disjunction (c) conditional (d) connective 2. Which of the following is equivalent to (p q)? (a) p q (b)

More information

, -the of all of a probability experiment. consists of outcomes. (b) List the elements of the event consisting of a number that is greater than 4.

, -the of all of a probability experiment. consists of outcomes. (b) List the elements of the event consisting of a number that is greater than 4. 4-1 Sample Spaces and Probability as a general concept can be defined as the chance of an event occurring. In addition to being used in games of chance, probability is used in the fields of,, and forecasting,

More information

Chapter 11: Probability and Counting Techniques

Chapter 11: Probability and Counting Techniques Chapter 11: Probability and Counting Techniques Diana Pell Section 11.3: Basic Concepts of Probability Definition 1. A sample space is a set of all possible outcomes of an experiment. Exercise 1. An experiment

More information

Probability Exercise 2

Probability Exercise 2 Probability Exercise 2 1 Question 9 A box contains 5 red marbles, 8 white marbles and 4 green marbles. One marble is taken out of the box at random. What is the probability that the marble taken out will

More information

Textbook: pp Chapter 2: Probability Concepts and Applications

Textbook: pp Chapter 2: Probability Concepts and Applications 1 Textbook: pp. 39-80 Chapter 2: Probability Concepts and Applications 2 Learning Objectives After completing this chapter, students will be able to: Understand the basic foundations of probability analysis.

More information